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Special Seminar - Music and Trust: Initial Thoughts
Date: March 28, 2012
Time: 11:00 AM
Location: Monell Chemical Senses Center, Room: Suite 100

Speaker(s):
David Gefen, PhD
Professor of Management Information Systems
Management Department
LeBow College of Business
Drexel University

Details:
Music is central to human culture and is known to affect emotions and behavior. Trust too is central to human culture, determining social behavior and economic activity. Why music affects behavior and emotions and whether somehow music may affect trust is unknown. The objective of this study is to take the first steps in addressing the relationship between music and trust. The study examines how different tempos of music affect behavior during a trust game while recording neurological activity in the prefrontal cortex through functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIR). The results suggest that music and trust might be related at least in relation to Brodmann Area 9, which was associated in previous research with increased behavioral inhibition of voluntary behavior. Specifically, the data indicate that allegro vivace tempo is associated with more activity in the right dorsal region of the medial prefrontal cortex and with increased trusting behavior in the trust game when compared to data collected without background music. This may indicate that fast tempo music may reduce apprehension, apprehension that would otherwise reduce trusting behavior. On the other hand, allegretto moderato tempo results in less activity in the right dorsal region of the medial prefrontal cortex and in less trusting behavior compared to there being no music in the background. Implications will be discussed.

Biosketch:

Directions:
The Monell Chemical Center is located at 3508 Market Street.

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