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 ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Biomedical Engineering
Program Objectives
Undergraduate Templates
Faculty Advisor's Listing
Health Systems and Technology
Bachelor's/Master's Dual Degree Program
Undergraduate Admission Information

GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical Science
Crossover Program
Graduate Studies at Drexel University
Career Integrated Education
Thesis Format Review: Issues and Answers
Graduate Admissions Information

Undergraduate Programs

The School of Biomedical Engineering, Sciences and Health Systems offers an innovative undergraduate degree program in Biomedical Engineering in partnership with the College of Engineering.

Biomedical Engineers Make a Difference
The biomedical engineering (B.M.E.) bachelor of science (B.S.) degree program prepares students to conceive, design, and develop devices and systems which improve human health and quality of life. Biomedical engineering synthesizes the life sciences with engineering, combining the strengths of both fields. This synthesis underlies the development of cost-effective technology for health care, including medical devices and diagnostics, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology.

Graduates of the biomedical engineering B.S. program can go on to develop:

  • Artificial skin for burn patients
  • Ultrasound probes to accelerate wound healing
  • Miniature pacemakers to prevent heart failure
  • Functional artificial limbs for amputees
  • Orthopedic implants for anatomical joint replacement
  • Systems to enhance drug delivery
  • New drugs with fewer side effects
  • Medical imaging systems that make exploratory surgery obsolete
  • Ultrasound imaging system to show parents three-dimensional images of their baby at its earliest stages
  • Surgical lasers to battle diseases that cause blindness
  • Intraocular lens implants for patients with cataracts
  • Artificial retinas to correct blindness
  • Incubators to safeguard premature infants

ACADEMIC ALLIANCES
The school enjoys close working relationship with select medical schools and institutes, health care institutions, and industries in the region which provide students with a broad array research and employment opportunities. It has recently formed an academic alliance with Thomas Jefferson University, a prominent medical university located in close proximity to the Drexel campus, to develop joint research and educational programs. The school is also launching an initiative in Bioinformatics in partnership with the Coriell Institute for Medical Research.

ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT
The School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems is a nationally recognized center for biomedical engineering education and research. Ongoing research is focused on biomedical ultrasound, biomedical imaging, biomedical systems and signal processing, cardiovascular systems, biomechanics, biomaterials, and tissue and cellular engineering. New academic initiatives include biomedical sensors and optics, human performance and neuroengineering, bioinformatics and computational biomedicine, and health systems technologies. Active research is pursued in the Biomaterials Laboratory, Biomechanics Research Laboratory; Biomedical Signal Processing Laboratory, Calhoun Comparative Medicine Laboratory, Cardiovascular Laboratory; Chronobiology Research Laboratory, Imaging and Computer Vision Center, Materials Research Laboratory, Scaling Signals and Systems Laboratory, Sensor/Bioelectrode Laboratory, and Ultrasound Laboratories.

DREXEL CO-OP: "THE ULTIMATE INTERNSHIP"®
The Drexel plan of co-operative education (co-op) enables the undergraduate student to balance classroom theory with practical experience prior to graduation. The Drexel Co-op program alternates classroom study with periods of paid professional employment in order to prepare students to be "workforce ready" and to adapt to rapid changes occurring in our society.

CO-OP AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Metropolitan Philadelphia has one of the highest concentrations of medical institutions, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in the nation. The bachelor of science degree in biomedical engineering gives access to a broad spectrum of career opportunities in medical device and equipment industry, prosthetics, and assist devices industry, biomaterials and implants industry, as well as the telemedicine, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and agricultural sectors. Biomedical engineering graduates are also ideally prepared for professional education in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and law. Those who choose to pursue graduate education can aim for careers in research and development, biomedical technology innovation and transfer, as well as health care technology management.

COURSE WORK
The Drexel Engineering Curriculum (tDEC)
During the first two years, undergraduate biomedical engineering students are enrolled in the Drexel Engineering Curriculum (tDEC) developed by the College of Engineering. Since its institutionalization in 1994, tDEC has served as a national model for integrated lower-division engineering curricula and has established Drexel as a leader in engineering education innovation. Its success culminated in the evolution of the upper division engineering curriculum developed under the auspices of the Gateway Engineering Education Coalition funded again by NSF and composed of 10 major universities led by Drexel University. Reaching beyond curricular innovation to the human dimension of learning, educational methods, and assessment tools, the Gateway project has set in motion an academic culture change which has provided a framework for curricular integration and a launching pad for exciting interdisciplinary programs.

The Major in Biomedical Engineering
The undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum is designed to strike a balance between academic breadth in biomedical engineering and specialization in biosensors, biomaterials, biomechanics, biochemical engineering, and biomedical signals, systems, and imaging.

Following the tDEC/Gateway model, the program provides innovative experiences in hands-on experimentation and engineering design as well as opportunities for personal growth, and development of leadership and communication skills. Working with a faculty advisor, students can select their core and elective courses from the curricula offered by the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems and the Departments of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the College of Information Science and Technology.

Read more about Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Program Objectives.

SAMPLE COURSE SEQUENCE
Freshman Year (Terms 1, 2, 3)
Chemical and Biological Foundations of Engineering I (3)
University Seminar (2)
Engineering Design and Laboratory I (4)
Mathematical Foundations of Engineering (3)
Physical Foundations of Engineering I (3)
Humanities and Communication I (3)

Chemical and Biological Foundations of Engineering II (3)
Engineering Design and Laboratory II (3)
Mathematical Foundations of Engineering II (3)
Physical Foundations of Engineering II (3)
Humanities and Communication II (3)

Chemical and Biological Foundations of Engineering III (3)
Engineering Design and Laboratory III (3)
Mathematical Foundations of Engineering III (3)
Physical Foundations of Engineering III (3)
Humanities and Communication III (3)

Sophomore Year (Terms 4 & 5)
Engineering Principles of Physiology I (3)
Materials I (3)
Systems I (3)
Energy I (3)
Evaluation and Presentation of Experimental Data I (4)

Engineering Principles of Physiology II (3)
Materials II (3)
Systems II (3)
Energy II (3)
Evaluation and Presentation of Experimental Data II (3)

Pre-Junior and Junior Years (Terms 6-9)
Interdisciplinary Courses* (4) 16 cu.
BME Core Courses* (8) 32 cu.
BME Laboratories (4) 8 cu.
Special Topics: Professional Ethics (3)

Senior Year
Senior Project Design (3) 8 c.u.
BME Core Electives* (3) 9 c.u.
BME Professional Electives* (3) 9 c.u.
Liberal Studies Electives (3) 9 c.u.
Free Electives (2) 6 c.u.

* Working with a faculty advisor, biomedical engineering majors can satisfy the interdisciplinary courses and biomedical engineering core and professional elective requirements by selecting from the following list of courses or sequences.

Recommended Interdisciplinary Courses include:

  • Engineering Biotechnology
  • Manufacturing Engineering
  • Evolutionary Systems
  • Complex Physiological Systems
  • Case-Study: The Body Synthetic
  • Case-Study: The Living Engine

Presently, there are eight undergraduate areas of concentration or templates for Biomedical Engineering undergraduates to select from:

ACADEMIC OPTIONS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Pre-med, pre-dental and pre-vet options, minor/major and dual degrees with other engineering and science disciplines; accelerated BS/MS programs are available for qualified students.

* Pre-Professional Programs
The Biomedical Engineering BS program provides options for premedical, pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary education. Students who want to prepare for admission to schools of medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine may obtain professional counseling and assistance from the Office of Preprofessional Programs administered by the College of Arts and Sciences.

* Minor/Major Programs; Double Major Programs; BS/MS Program
Biomedical engineering students can minor in another engineering or science discipline. A double major option is also available with other engineering disciplines. Qualified students can also enroll in the accelerated combined BS/MS program and complete the MS degree in 5 years. The BS/MS program allows students to earn an MS degree in either a single major or two different majors of engineering, e.g. BS in Materials Engineering and MS indifferent majors of engineering, e.g. BS in Materials Engineering and MS in Biomedical Engineering.

* University Honors
Program Students in the Biomedical Engineering program may apply for admission to the University Honors Program. Admission depends on superior academic performance at Drexel and may be approved after a personal interview with the Honors Committee.

* University Leadership Program
Drexel graduates in Biomedical Engineering will be the leaders of their profession - and their communities - in the twenty-first century. The University Leadership Program helps cultivate leadership skills and engages students in exploring the complex aspects of successful leadership by offering multi-dimensional courses featuring service learning.

 

Bachelor's/Master's Dual Degreee Program

THE DREXEL DIFFERENCE
Quality and innovation are synonymous with Drexel's academic programs where our goal is to prepare you for the career of your choice. But what if you already know that your ultimate career goal requires more than a bachelor's degree?

If you enroll in Drexel's traditional plan, your undergraduate degree will provide you with three periods of co-operative education and take five years to complete. In addition, fill-time graduate programs may take at least two more years. Part-time graduate study takes even longer, sometimes several years more. You wish that you didn't have to spend all that extra time and money to accomplish your educational goal. But that's the only way to do it. Right?

Here's where Drexel's innovative programs and quality education at the undergraduate and graduate levels can work to your advantage. Drexel's Bachelor's/Master's Dual Degree Program may be the right choice for you.

WHAT IS THE BACHELOR'S/MASTER'S (B.S./M.S.) DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM?
It is an accelerated program providing the academically qualified student an opportunity to earn both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree (two diplomas are awarded) in program areas of his/her choice in five years, the time normally required to finish a bachelor's degree alone. Because both degrees are completed in the time it takes to obtain a bachelor's degree, both degrees may be completed at the undergraduate tuition rate.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF COMPLETING THE B.S./M.S. DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM?
The program combines the practical work experience of Drexel undergraduate co-operative education with the graduate credentials of an advanced degree. Students may earn both degrees in the same major, or may complete their master's degree in a different field. With both an undergraduate and graduate degree and practical work experience, B.S./M.S. graduates enter the work force with specialized knowledge and training, which gives the Drexel B.S./M.S. student a wide range of career opportunities.

HOW CAN I COMPLETE TWO DEGREES AND CO-OP IN FIVE YEARS?
This is a demanding program, but several benefits are built into the B.S./M.S. Dual Degree Program which make it possible to do in the time allotted. For instance, fewer undergraduate credits are required for the combined degrees (180 instead of 192). Also, co-op experiences may be adjusted (two co-op periods instead of three) giving the B.S./M.S. student two additional quarters to take courses and to conduct research. If needed, students may also take evening courses while on co op.

HOW DOES TUITION WORK?
Students in the B.S./M.S. program complete both undergraduate and graduate work in the same amount of time as if they were completing the bachelor's degree alone. Therefore, one of the advantages of the program allows billing to be at the undergraduate tuition rate.

Some additional charges may be incurred, however, if students opt to take two additional quarters of coursework instead of co-op, or if they choose to take evening graduate courses while on co-op. However, Drexel provides a fellowship to cover a portion of these additional costs, as follows:

  • Those who opt for two extra quarters of coursework instead of one co-op period are charged at the undergraduate rate for the extra quarters in school. Students receive a fellowship which provides 40 percent of their tuition (excluding fees) during these two quarters. (Students may take up to two terms of classes substituting for co-op quarters.)
  • Students taking evening graduate courses at Drexel while on co-op are charged the graduate tuition rate. Students receive a fellowship which provides 40 percent of their tuition (excluding fees) during this quarter.

Students eligible in these two circumstances for the fellowship should contact the collegiate representative listed on the back of this factsheet.

All Drexel and federal financial aid continues for the duration of the program as long as you:

  • Continue in the B.S./M.S. program
  • Take a combination of undergraduate and graduate courses
  • Complete both programs in no more than five years with both degrees completed at the same time (both diplomas awarded at the same time).

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO APPLY FOR THE PROGRAM?
Exceptional students with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 and who are enrolled as five-year co-op students are eligible for the program. Students formally apply for the program after they have completed 90 credits and before completing 120 credits. We strongly encourage planning for the program as early as freshman year. Students who have more than 120 credits are not eligible.

ARE TRANSFER STUDENTS ELIGIBLE?
Transfer students are eligible to join the B.S./M.S. program. However, they must be able to complete both the bachelor's and master's programs in the time it would take them to complete the bachelor's degree alone. The co-op requirement for transfer students may be adjusted upon the approval of the academic dean and the co-op office.

Transfer students must be at Drexel for at least two terms prior to being accepted into the B.S./M.S. program and must have a Drexel GPA of at least 3.0 to be eligible. In addition, past academic performance at previous institutions will be considered. Transfer students may not be accepted to the B.S./M.S. program with more than 120 credits.

International transfer students must have at least the required minimum TOEFL score for their graduate program of study to be admitted to the B.S./M.S. program. If their TOEFL scores do not meet the required minimum, they must make arrangements to retake the TOEFL through Drexel's English Language Center. Additional terms of English language study may be required.

WHAT IS THE APPLICATION PROCESS?
You will need to apply formally to the program. Applications are available in the Office of Graduate Admissions or in your collegiate advisor's office. The application is accompanied by a plan of study prepared in consultation with an undergraduate and graduate advisor and approved by the department head and dean. Approval of entry into the program is granted by the undergraduate and graduate department heads and the academic dean.

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS?
Students enrolled in the B.S./M.S. dual degree program must complete 180 undergraduate quarter credits for the bachelor's degree and at least 45 graduate quarter credits for the master's degree. All graduate departmental requirements must be satisfied in full, including a thesis, if required by the program. Master's thesis requirements may be completed in the summer term of the final year with prior approval. B.S./M.S. students work closely with the program advisor to make sure that they are following their plan of study. Students in the B.S./M.S. program must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in their undergraduate and graduate coursework in order to remain in the program.

WHO WILL BE MY ADVISOR?
It is very important that students in the B.S./M.S. dual degree program work closely with a faculty member to make sure that they are following their plan of study and progressing appropriately. Drexel ensures that each student has an undergraduate and graduate advisor for each program.

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE B.S./M.S. PROGRAM?
For more information about the program, please contact:
Dr. William Freedman
Associate Director
215-895-2249
william_freedman@coe.drexel.edu

 

 

Graduate Programs

The School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems (formerly the Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute) is a nationally recognized center of research and graduate education. It offers multidisciplinary graduate instruction and research on both a full- and part-time basis.

The faculty includes individuals with engineering, physics, mathematics, biostatistics, life science, medical, and clinical specialties. Multidisciplinary research is carried out through collaboration among Drexel University faculty members and with several medical schools and hospitals in the Philadelphia area.

For graduate students, the school offers master of science (M.S.) and Ph.D. programs in biomedical engineering and biomedical science. Areas of specialization available or under development include biomechanics, rehabilitation, biomaterials and tissue engineering, biosensors and biomedical imaging, biostatistics, genome science and bioinformatics, human factors and performance engineering, neuroengineering, and systems biology.

In addition to courses offered by the School, various departments at Drexel University offer courses specifically designed for graduate students in biomedical engineering and biomedical science. These courses permit students to acquire advanced knowledge needed for graduate research or for a future career in highly specialized fields.

Core Curriculum

The school's overall objective is to provide multidisciplinary programs with a core curriculum and research in selected areas. Biomedical engineering students should have an academic background in engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics. Students who do not have an engineering background must enroll in the Cross­over Program, which provides the necessary undergraduate engineering coursework (see below: Additional Information). The core curriculum provides the necessary training in medical science, computational and quantitative methods, modeling and simulation, and biomedical/engineering applications to prepare students to apply their engineering skills and perspective to current problems in biology and medicine. Fields in which students may focus their advanced studies and research efforts are based on the research strengths and thrusts of the school. The concentration areas include biosensors and biomedical imaging, biomaterials and tissue engineering, biomechanics and human performance engineering, neuroengineering, and functional bioinformatics.

Core courses in the biomedical science program are directed toward students who have a basic life sciences or paramedical undergraduate background. They are designed to educate these students in quantitative analysis, mathematical modeling, and fundamental computer and informatics skills. Students are then encouraged to combine their knowledge of the life sciences with their newly acquired analytical skills to focus in such areas as biostatistics, genome science, and systems biology.

Additional Information

Students without an academic background in engineering or physical science who wish to enter the biomedical engineering program must enroll in the Crossover Program, an accelerated curriculum designed to fulfill the requirements for admission to a Drexel graduate engineering program. Classes in the program do not count toward the MS. degree, and they may entail one to two years of additional full-time study. For specific course requirements, students should contact the graduate adviser for biomedical engineering or the director of the school.

Applicants to the graduate program must meet the requirements for admission to graduate studies at Drexel University. Candidates for degrees in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems are required to maintain academic standards applicable to all graduate students at Drexel University.

Full course descriptions and additional information on University policies are published in the annual graduate catalog, available from the Admissions Office. Information is also available on the University's website, www.drexel.edu.

Degrees Offered

  • MS. in Biomedical Engineering
  • MS. in Biomedical Science
  • Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering
  • Ph.D. in Biomedical Science

The Basics of a Drexel Graduate Degree

The following sections describe the basic regulations governing Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees at Drexel.

Master of Science

Each MS. student develops a plan of study in consultation with a faculty adviser. Most Drexel MS. programs require a minimum of 45 to 48 credits (depending on the program), with most courses in most departments being 3 credits each. Specific curricular requirements are detailed in the graduate catalog.

Many programs either require a masterís thesis or make the thesis an option. The University, however, recognizes that the completion of a thesis may present a challenge to part-time students. Most departments that require or recommend a thesis will try to accommodate the special needs of students who are working full-time. Such students may be able to develop an on-the-job research project that serves as the basis of the thesis. Other programs may offer an alternative way to fulfill the research requirement.

Most MS. programs can be pursued full-time or part-time. Full-time masterís students can usually complete a degree in two years. Part-time students may need three to five years of study The University requires that a masterís degree be completed within seven years after the initial enrollment.

Dual Degree Options

The University encourages students with broad interests to consider a dual MS. option. Through the dual MS. program, graduate students already enrolled in a masterís degree program at Drexel have the opportunity to work simultaneously on two masterís degrees and to complete both at the same time, with a reduced credit requirement for both. Examples of compatible dual-masterís programs would be biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, materials engineering, biomedical science, and bioscience.

To be eligible, graduate students must be working on their first degree when requesting admission to the second. They must obtain approval from the graduate advisers of both programs and work out a plan of study encompassing coursework and/or research (thesis) credits for both degrees.

Students may transfer as many as 15 credits from one program to the other, usually in the form of electives. Therefore, to complete a dual masterís-degree program, they are required to complete a minimum of 60 graduate credits (instead of 45 credits per individual program).The actual credit total may be higher, depending on each departmentís requirements. The transfer of credits from one program to the other depends on the programs and must be approved by graduate advisers from both programs.

Applicants considering two degrees are encouraged to contact the appropriate academic departments.

The Drexel Ph.D.

The focus of the Ph.D. program is the development and execution of a major research project. In pursuing the Ph.D., students normally earn a minimum of 90 course credits beyond the B.S. Generally, the first 45 credits are at the MS. level, and the second 45 at the post-MS. level. The latter portion includes course credits earned for dissertation research.

A Ph.D. qualifying examination must be taken after the first year of graduate study. The exam verifies that students have the appropriate academic foundation for the more advanced coursework. To develop the dissertation, a student must arrange an association with a supervising professor who has similar research interests.

Each student must complete a Ph.D. candidacy examination before being officially named as a Drexel Ph.D. candidate. The purpose of the examination is to determine the studentís preparation and ability to undertake dissertation research. The student then completes the research and writes the thesis. After the supervising faculty accepts the dissertation, the candidate defends it orally.

Most Ph.D. studies at Drexel are pursued on a full-time basis The University has a residency requirement: Ph.D. candidates must have at least three consecutive terms of full-time study The University also requires Ph.D. candidates to be registered in each consecutive term while pursuing their degree. Students who begin Ph.D. studies with a bachelorís degree must finish the full program within seven years. Students who enroll with a masterís must complete the Ph.D. within five years.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is concerned with the application of engineering and science methodologies to the analysis of biological and physiological problems and to the delivery of health care. The biomedical engineer requires the analytical tools and broad physical knowledge of modern engineering and science, fundamental understanding of the biological or physiological system, and familiarity with recent technological breakthroughs.

The biomedical engineer serves as an interface between traditional engineering disciplines and living systems and may work in either direction, applying the patterns of living organisms to engineering design or engineering new approaches to human health. Thus the biomedical engineer may use his/her knowledge of physiological systems to reverse engineer nature, creating, for example, artificial tissues and neural networks. On the other hand, a biomedical engineer may use his/her knowledge of engineering to create new equipment or environments for such purposes as maximizing human performance, accelerating wound healing, or providing non-invasive diagnostic tools.

Master's Program

The core requirements for the master's in biomedical engineering encompass approximately 45 course credits. (Most courses carry three credits each.) A thesis is highly recommended. A non-thesis option is also offered (students who choose this option must pass a comprehensive examination.) Students who receive an assistantship or other form of assistance from the University must complete a thesis.

Coursework

The overall objective of the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems is to provide multidisciplinary programs offering an instructional core curriculum and research in selected areas. Students entering biomedical engineering are typically individuals with undergraduate degrees in engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics. Students without an academic background in engineering or physical science who wish to enter the biomedical engineering program may enroll in the Crossover Program, which provides the necessary undergraduate engineering coursework (see below). The new core curriculum provides the necessary training in medical science, modeling and simulation, and biomedical engineering applications to allow students to apply their engineering skills and perspective to current problems in biology and medicine. Areas in which students may focus their advanced studies and research attention include biomechanics and biomaterials, tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, human factors and performance engineering, and neuroengineering.

Crossover Program

This program of study is constructed from a combination of undergraduate and graduate courses offered by the school or by the Universityís engineering and physical science departments and is designed to bring the student up to a level that conforms to the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) requirements for engineering education. The program usually requires one to two additional years of full-time study. No graduate credit is given for the undergraduate courses. For specific course requirements contact the graduate adviser for biomedical engineering or the director of the school.

Core Curriculum

  • Medical Sciences I, II, III
  • Biochemistry Laboratory
  • Biosimulation I: Virtual Instrumentation
  • Biosimulation II: Modeling of Physiological Systems
  • Seminar

Three courses selected from the following:

  • Introduction to Bioacoustics
  • Medical Imaging I
  • Biomechanics I
  • Biomaterials I
  • Biomedical Signal Processing
  • Introduction to Information Systems
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Systems Analysis in Biology

 

Ph.D. Program

Superior students with training in engineering, natural science, or physical science -- as well as individuals with academic or professional degrees in the medical science disciplines -- will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

To be awarded the Ph.D., students must complete 90 credits (credits earned toward a masterís degree may apply toward the 90), fulfill a one-year residency requirement, and successfully pass the qualifying examination, the candidacy examination, and a Ph.D. dissertation and oral defense. Prospective Ph.D. students are welcome to contact the school to discuss their research interests.

Transfer Credits/Credit Reductions

Transfer Credits/Credit Reductions

Previous graduate coursework in a related discipline may be accepted for transfer credits toward a Drexel degree. (Students should review the graduate catalog for detailed information on the transfer policy.)

Areas of Specialization

Concentration areas in biomedical engineering include:

Biomechanics and Biomaterials
Biomechanics and biomaterials is designed to meet two objectives: to acquaint students with the responses of biological tissues to mechanical loads as well as with the mechanical properties of living systems; and to familiarize the student with natural tissues and the implants designed to replace them.

Tissue Engineering
The concentration in tissue engineering is offered jointly with the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering. The program builds on the fundamental knowledge of natural and synthetic biomaterials and cellular biology and educates students in the emerging field of cellular and tissue engineering. Specialized courses developed for this program include Advanced Scaffold Design and Manufacturing, Factor-Mediated Tissue Engineering, Biosurfaces, Computer-Aided Tissue Engineering, Integrated CAD/CAM for Tissue Engineering Applications, and Cellular Biomechanics.

Biomedical Imaging
Biomedical imaging focuses on the theoretical and practical issues related to machine vision, image processing and analysis, and signal processing associated with such medical applications as ultrasound, optics, magnetic resonance, and autoradiographic imaging.

Human Factors and Performance Engineering
Human factors and performance engineering provides the student with the background and skills needed to create work and living environments which improve human health and enhance performance. Courses in this area of specialization cover such topics as evolutionary medicine, chronobiology, biomechanics, motor systems, human nutrition, toxicology, risk assessment, social factors in health and aging, and environmental design.

Neuroengineering
Neuroengineering is broadly defined to include the modeling of neural and endocrine systems, neural networks, complexity in physiological systems, evolutionary influences in biological control systems, neurocontrol, neurorobotics, and neuroprosthetics.

Biomedical Science

Biomedical science is a broad field concerned with the application of fundamental biological research and quantitative analysis to human health.

The School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems is a nationally recognized center of research and graduate education offering multidisciplinary graduate instruction and research in biomedical engineering and science on both a full- and part-time basis. The faculty includes individuals with engineering, physics, mathematics, biostatistics, life science, medical, and clinical specialties.

Master's Program

The core requirements for the masterís in biomedical science encompass approximately 45 course credits. (Most courses carry three credits each.) A thesis is highly recommended. A non-thesis option is also offered (students who choose this option must pass a comprehensive examination). Students who receive an assistantship or other form of assistance from the University must complete a thesis.

Coursework

The overall objective of the school is to provide multidisciplinary programs offering an instructional core curriculum and research in selected areas. The graduate program in biomedical science educates students whose undergraduate education is in basic life sciences (e.g., biology or biochemistry) or paramedical disciplines (e.g., nursing, physical therapy, or medical technology) in quantitative analysis, mathematical modeling, fundamental computing skills, and informatics.

For students entering with degrees in physics, mathematics, and/or computer science, the school, in close collaboration with the Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, provides the coursework needed to acquire proficiency in the life sciences. Students in biomedical science achieve depth in the modeling of living systems and biomedical information processing and display.

Students may also choose to specialize in biostatistics. Two new specialization areas under development are genome science and systems biology. Students who graduate with a master's degree from the biomedical science program often continue clinical training in medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine; pursue further graduate study toward the Ph.D. degree; or work in such fields as health care, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, etc.

One unique aspect of the school's program in biomedical science is its ability to integrate aspects of physiology and molecular biology with quantitative analysis, mathematical modeling, and computer processing to create a systems approach to biomedical research and applications. Elective courses such as Biological Controls Systems I, II, and III; Evolutionary Medicine; Human Chronobiology and Sleep I and II; and Complexity in Living Systems reflect the school's emphasis on a multidisciplinary approaches to the most current research in biology and medicine.

Core Curriculum

  • Mathematics I, II, III
  • Biostatistics
  • Mathematical Models in Biology
  • Introduction to C Programming
  • Principles of Systems Analysis I, II
  • Seminar
  • Physics of Living Systems I

 

Ph.D. Program

Superior students with training in engineering, natural science, or physical science ó as well as individuals with academic or professional degrees in the medical science disciplines ó will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

To be awarded the Ph.D., students must complete 90 credits (credits earned toward a master's degree may apply toward the 90), fulfill a one-year residency requirement, and successfully pass the qualifying examination, the candidacy examination, and a Ph.D. dissertation and oral defense. Prospective Ph.D. students are welcome to contact the school to discuss their research interests.

Transfer Credits/Credit Reductions

Previous graduate coursework in a related discipline may be accepted for transfer credits toward a Drexel degree. (Students should review the graduate catalog for detailed information on the transfer policy)

Areas of Specialization

The school is currently developing two new areas of specialization within the biomedical science program in addition to biostatistics.

Genome science is designed to provide students with advanced training in biochemistry, recombinant DNA technology, and information science. Systems biology trains students to deal with organisms as systems and includes coursework in biochemistry, cell biology, biological control systems, and neural networks.

Biostatistics is presently offered as a specialization in biomedical science. The program is designed to answer the demand for life scientists with advanced training in biostatistics and experimental design. This program is also suited for students with prior training in mathematics or business.

Last Revised 4/00

©2002 School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health systems.

 Last Update: 4/16/03

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©2004 School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health systems. All rights reserved. Last Modified: 2/18/2004